July 11 – World Population Day – Investing in Young People

Today marks World Population Day, an annual event observed on 11 July to raise awareness of global population issues.
Established by the Governing Council of the United Nations Development Programme in 1989, it was inspired by the interest in Five Billion Day on 11 July 1987 – approximately the date when the world’s population reached five billion.
This year, the theme is “Investing in Young People.”
In 1989, in its decision 89/46, the Governing Council of the United Nations Development Programme recommended that, in order to focus attention on the urgency and importance of population issues in the context of overall development plans and programmes and the need to find solutions for these issues, 11 July should be observed by the international community as World Population Day.
Today’s 1.8 billion young people are shaping social and economic realities, challenging norms and values, and building the foundation of the world’s future. Yet too many young people continue to grapple with poverty, inequality and human rights violations that prevent them from reaching their personal and collective potential.
On 2014 World Population Day, we call for investments in support of the largest-ever generation of youth.
Frankly speaking, every budget planning is linked with the demand and generation of funds. For more demands the resources have to be tapped accordingly. To maintain the demand and resources, population growth plays a vital role. Thus, only family planning can save economies. India too need to improve health services, invest in education and vocational training of its young population, and create jobs for absorbing them into the workforce This there is a need to pay special attention to provide these services and relevant facilities to the rural areas (as well as the urban) to enhance peoples’ well-being and prosperity throughout the country.
However, if these steps are not taken, and the government is unable to keep pace with the needed infrastructure, healthcare and education of the burgeoning population, the result would be a further slowing of the economy, increasing joblessness and poverty with a possible backlash from frustrated (uneducated, unemployed) young people.
Facts about the global population:
As of 1 January 2014, the world’s population was estimated to be 7,137,661,030, and increases by 2.3 people every second.
The total number of people who have ever lived has been estimated by the Population Bureau to be around 108 billion.
The world population is estimated to have reached one billion in 1804, with two, three and four billion in 1927, 1960 and 1974 respectively.
These figures mean that about one fifteenth of all the people who have ever lived are alive today.
Vatican City (800) and Nauru (9,378) are the states with the lowest populations.
30% of the world’s population generally eats with chopsticks.
China, India, USA, Indonesia, Pakistan and Brazil account for half the world’s people. More than one in three people are Chinese or Indian.
What are the risks of overpopulation?
Food: Every day, 25,000 people die of malnutrition and hunger-related diseases, of which around 18,000 are under the age of five. Food production and distribution is stretched as the population increases to an unsustainable level.
Water shortages: One billion people across the globe lack access to sufficient water for consumption, sanitation and agriculture, as aquifers are depleted faster than they can be replenished and glaciers melt.
Oil and gas: There is a finite amount of fossil fuels and it is being used up at an incredible rate. The concept “Peak Oil” means that in the future, perhaps between 2015 and 2020, world oil production will max out and then start to decline.
Air quality: Childhood asthma rates have risen in the past two decades, as the population grows and the number of factories and cars increase. Those in undeveloped countries are also at risks, where people depend on burning wood and dung for cooking and heat.
Ozone Layer: Chemicals from human industries, such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), destroy ozone. Some of the most dangerous CFCs have been banned in many countries, but their long-lasting nature means they continue to deplete the ozone layer. Currently, the layer is being destroyed at a rate of about 4% per decade.
Overcrowding: Tightly-packed housing or the sharing of a home between too many people can lead to problems with hygiene, violence, congestion, unemployment, air pollution, social problems and tension. There is an increased risk of the spread of infectious diseases.
Conflicts and Wars: Some of the most brutal and persistent conflicts and wars of the past decades have been driven by overpopulation and disputes over resources. The 1994 Rwandan genocide, the mass slaughter of Tutsi and moderate Hutu by members of the Hutu majority, was partly influenced by environmental factors to do with overpopulation – such as land pressure and unsustainable agricultural practices.
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